Author page: Fran Haddock

Histoires de la ligne de front Episode 3 : Virunga sans énergie fossile

“Le parc national des Virunga, situé dans l’est de la RDC (République démocratique du Congo), est un patrimoine mondial de l’UNESCO, un site Ramsar et le plus ancien parc national d’Afrique. Le parc a une valeur universelle incroyable pour sa biodiversité et sa beauté naturelle, et abrite l’une des dernières populations de gorilles de montagne de la planète. Les Virunga abritent également…

Stories from the Frontline – Episode 3: Fossil Fuel Free Virunga

Virunga National Park located in eastern DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo) is a UNESCO World Heritage, a Ramsar Site and the oldest national park in Africa. The park has incredible universal value for biodiversity and natural beauty, and is home to one of the planet’s last surviving populations of mountain gorillas. Virunga also sits on vast quantities of natural resources including untapped…

Keep Coal in the Hole: is the Controversial Cumbrian Coal Mine Being Reconsidered?

What’s Going On Here? After pledging to phase out coal, the UK government allowed planning of the first new deep coal mine in 30 years. After pressure from environmental groups, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) and head climate figures, the county council may now be reconsidering the application.  What Does This Mean? Last October Cumbria County Council permitted planning permission for…

How to Make Pet Ownership More Sustainable: What’s Your Pet’s Environmental Pawprint?

Fran Haddock and Jo Wills are both small animal veterinary surgeons with a passion for sustainability and sustainable pet ownership. None of the products mentioned in this article are sponsors. Have you ever considered the environmental impact of your pet? Although it may not be highest on your eco-action list, pets carry significant environmental paw prints throughout their lifetime due to their…

Shell’s Greenwashing Tweet Backfires

What’s Going On Here? On Tuesday morning, fossil-fuel major Shell had the audacity to post a poll on Twitter asking the public what actions they were willing to take as individuals to reduce their carbon emissions, sparking spectacular backlash. What Does This Mean? High profile responders included US congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Greta Thunberg and climate scientists Prof Katharine Hayhoe and Peter Kalmus.…